Canada has trained less than half the number of cops needed to spot drug-impaired drivers: chiefs

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CTV News Channel A man smokes a marijuana joint during the annual 4/20 marijuana celebration on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on April 20, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang OTTAWA — The Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police says it is unlikely to reach its goal of having 2,000 officers trained to spot drug-impaired drivers when marijuana becomes legal later this year. Last fall, the agency representing about 90 per cent of police agencies in Canada warned the government that before pot becomes legal, its members need more time to train officers in the new laws as well as to recognized drug-impaired drivers in a roadside stop. Natalie Wright, a spokeswoman for the chiefs of police, tells The Canadian Press that only 733 officers had completed the specialized training as of May, up from 665 in February. In March 2017, about 600 officers had the training. “While it is unlikely that we will attain our target number of 2,000 Drug Recognition Experts by October 17th, we are confident in our present processes, knowing that they will continually improve with time as we build capacity,” said Wright in a written statement. Canada has trained less than half the number of cops needed to spot drug-impaired drivers: chiefs

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